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PAWS January – Barney’s Bobbies

Michael Benning talked about Barney's Bobbies

Michael Benning

PAWS January – Barney’s Bobbies

Relating the story of Barney’s Bobbies, Michael joined the police force in 1969 and was paid the princely sum of £17 per week. He spent the first 5 years of his career ‘on the beat’ and spent many nights rattling shop doors and was in trouble from sergeant Barney if he did not detect some sort of crime on his shift! The sergeant was very hot on discipline and correct uniform and his ‘Bobbies’ were some of the best on the force.

Michael soon had a new job on Cycle Patrol, which was great except that the bike was far too big. On telling his sergeant that he could not reach the pedals even if he could get on the bike, he was told to just wheel it around until he grew! There were no personal radios in those days so he had to phone in to the station every hour to get instructions using a Police Box (Tardis).

TV programmes such as Dickson of Dock Green and later The Bill were good representations of how the Police worked. Michael finished his career on the hijack team at Stansted Airport and ran many marathons in the Police team. He also gave us an insight into how things had changed in the Police Force over the years and of some of the amusing and sometimes dangerous incidents that he had been involved in.

Our next meeting is on the 23rd February when our speaker Stacey Belbin will tell us about “Lady Grace the boat.” Visitors are welcome at a cost of £5.00. Details of all our meetings and speakers can be found on the diary of the home page of the Winstred 100 website.

If you would like further information about P.A.W.S please ring either of the following committee members: Alice Holmes 01206 735510 or Jane Anderson 01206 735505.

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Parish Safety Volunteers

Parish Safety VolunteerParish Safety Volunteers

Essex Police and Essex County Fire & Rescue Service are working together to help make a difference in local communities, helping people to live & feel safer.  They are launching a brand new volunteer scheme and are looking to recruit two Parish Safety Volunteers per Parish in Essex, tasked with arranging and conducting home safety visits.  These volunteers will deliver crucial fire and crime prevention advice, extensive knowledge of local support services and the ability to fit smoke detectors directly into the homes of those most in need.

If you’re interested, you’ll need to apply for interview and be required to undertake Essex Police vetting. You will receive comprehensive training from both Essex County Fire and Rescue Service and Essex Police, a full uniform and all equipment required to carry out the role. To ensure volunteers are well supported, Parish Safety Volunteers from across the county will be invited to on-going training and networking opportunities throughout the year.

Scheme Information

1. What is the purpose of the Parish Safety Volunteer Scheme?

The purpose of this initiative is to make local communities safer, more resilient and better protected from fire and crime. It will do this by:

  • Reducing accidental dwelling fires in the parishes in which Parish Safety Volunteers operate.
  • Reducing burglaries in the parishes in which Parish Safety Volunteers operate.
  • Making people feel safer in the parishes in which Parish Safety Volunteers operate.

2. Why are Essex Police and Essex County Fire and Rescue Service working together on this?

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service alongside Essex Police have a joint desire to increase community resilience and support the building of stronger communities in Essex.

2. What will Parish Safety Volunteers deliver in their Parishes?

Parish Safety Volunteers will be required to…

  • Conduct Parish Safety Visits and deliver Essex Police and Essex County Fire and Rescue Service approved advice and support.
  • Have a comprehensive understanding of what support is already offered in the Parish and be able to signpost accordingly.
  • Be able to fit smoke detectors in the homes of local residents.
  • Participate in activities in order to generate Parish Safety Visits and promote awareness of the scheme in their Parish.

4. What else will Parish Safety Volunteers be expected to do whilst volunteering?

Parish Safety Volunteers will be expected to…

  • Liaise with Essex County Fire and Rescue Service in order to arrange visits and confirm volunteering availability.
  • Keep and maintain the Parish Safety Volunteer equipment provided by Essex Police and Essex County Fire and Rescue Service.
  • Attend Parish Safety Volunteer group information, training, review and update sessions
  • Complete the paperwork required of Parish Safety Volunteers and return it within the agreed timeframe.
  • Adhere to the policies, expectations and procedures required by Essex County Fire and Rescue Service and Essex Police at all times.

5. How will Parish Safety Volunteers find individuals requiring a visit?

Referrals will be generated by Essex County Fire and Rescue Service and Essex Police, through the processes already used by the organisations to arrange home safety visits.

Referrals will also be generated by Parish Safety Volunteers themselves, as they will be promoting the service and already have some local knowledge of areas and individuals that would benefit from a PSV visit.

6. How will Parish Safety Volunteers interact with the Parish Council?

Parish Safety Volunteers will not require co-ordination or management from Parish Councils as Essex County Fire and Rescue Service will provide all support needed.

However, we will set up a direct line of communication between Parish Safety Volunteers and Parish Councils. This could mean that volunteers attend Parish Council Meetings to update on progress and activity. It could also mean a telephone or email update from volunteers. This will be a local arrangement tailored to the needs of the Parish Council in question and established when the scheme is introduced to the Parish.

7. How will Essex County Fire and Rescue Service and Essex Police keep Parish Councils updated on the PSV Scheme?

ECFRS will send a bi-monthly progress update to all Parish Councils for whom the Parish Safety Co-ordinator holds contact details. This will be sent on approximately the final day of the month.

8. How will we know what impact the Parish Safety Volunteers have on their Parish?

The Parish Safety Volunteer Co-ordinator will carry out a robust evaluation of the PSV scheme. This will be completed in by October 2016.

9. Key Contact

Parish Safety Volunteer Co-ordinator: Essex County Fire and Rescue Service – Kieron Moir.

No: 01376 576237

Interested?

Please complete an application form, or get in touch using PSV@essex-fire.gov.uk.

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Restorative Justice

essex-restorative-justiceSuccessful Trial of Restorative Justice Completed

Essex Police have successfully completed a six-months trial in West Essex, which includes the districts of Epping, Brentwood, Harlow and Thurrock.  It is now intended to roll it out to the rest of Essex from October and the Police & Crime Commissioner is inviting those groups and agencies who might be interested in getting involved to attend one of two launch events:

  • 27th October  12.00 – 15.00 at The Rayleigh Club, Hullbridge Road, Rayleigh, SS6 9QS ,
  • 28th October 12.00 – 15.00 at The Essex Golf and Country Club, Colchester, CO6 2JU.

The afternoon will begin with a buffet lunch, followed by talks and presentations focusing on the success of the West Essex RJ pilot, the impact of restorative justice on those that take part, and what the roll-out means for you in your organisation.  

The launch will involve speeches from PCC Nick Alston, members of the RJ Hub and examples from those who have participated in Restorative Justice in Essex.

If you are interested in attending please contact Emma Callaghan, Restorative Justice Hub Development Manager, by email emma.callaghan@essex.pnn.police.uk, before Friday 16th October.

So, What is Restorative Justice About?

Restorative Justice is a process which gives victims the opportunity to meet or communicate with those who have offended against them.  It holds offenders to account and helps them take responsibility for the harm they have caused.  Both parties discuss next steps and the offender can then make amends.

Victims are given the chance to explain to a criminal the impact a crime has had on them, ask questions of the offender and seek an apology.  It enables offenders to be held to account for what they have done but also take responsibility for the harm they have caused.  

If a face-to-face meeting is not appropriate they can do so indirectly via letters or messages. Restorative justice is used for less serious offences or conflicts, such as graffiti or anti-social behaviour.  Everyone involved must consent to take part.

The Benefits are Apparent

  • 85% victims are satisfied following an RJ process.
  • Re-offending is reduced by as much as 27%.
  • 98% direct RJ ends in mutually agreed outcomes.
  • RJ decreases post-traumatic stress and allows victims of crime to return to work more quickly.
  • In neighbour disputes, RJ can help to avoid evictions and help neighbours live in peace.

Read more on the Police & Crime Commissioner’s website or download their information leaflet.  

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Vishing Fraud Alert

serious-crime-directorateVishing Fraud Alert

Please be aware of recent fraud activity that is targeting businesses within our Region.

The Fraud

Fraudsters are ringing up company wage clerks/finance directors claiming to be from Barclay’s Fraud department and gaining permission to remotely access the victim’s computer system.  This is on the pretence that their business account has been compromised. The victim opens up the bank account, the fraudster then transfers the money into what they state will be the company’s new, none compromised account.  The funds are then automatically distributed in seconds. Total regional losses have exceeded £1 million.

Protect your company

  • Do not be afraid to end cold calls.
  • Do not to assume a caller is genuine just because they hold some information about you. Criminals may already have got hold of some basic information about a potential victim, such as a name, address and account details to try to make the call appear legitimate.
  • If in any doubt hang up and call the bank yourself on numbers you know are genuine, however be sure to hang the phone up long enough to prevent the fraudster holding the line open.
  • NEVER call the bank back on the number the caller provides you.
  • The Bank will never call and ask for remote access to your computers or for passwords to access your accounts.

If you are a victim of “Vishing” call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or use our online tool to report the fraud and receive a police crime reference number. DI 3159 Lee Morton Serious Economic Crime Unit

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Essex Police Go App

ecm_1New App from Essex Police

Savvy smartphone users will soon be able to access the latest news from Essex Police through a brand new app.

To mark the first year anniversary of Essex Community Messaging (ECM), the ECM app was launched on Thursday October 1, 2015 and is available to download for iPhone and Android devices.

The app will enable residents to receive localised messages straight to their device, from Essex Police officers, staff and key partners such as Neighbourhood Watch.

Those who sign up will be able to select information on what they would like to receive – based on where they live, work or socialise. A new photo feature will also allow users to view images to identify stolen property and help find missing or wanted people.

In its first year, ECM has already proved useful in alerting residents to crime and missing people in their areas – and even assisted in the conviction of a bogus charity collector. Earlier this year, PC Sam Waters sent out a message to alert Wickford residents about a man who was believed to be knocking on doors requesting sponsorship money for charity and using the money for his own gain. The ECM message led to 12 people coming forward with information.

On the information that was received, a 30-year-old man was arrested and later admitted four counts of fraud by false representation. He received a 12 week suspended sentence at Basildon Magistrates’ Court.

Chief Supt Luke Collison, ECM Project Lead, said:

ECM App Benefit help play an active roleFollowing the success of the initial ECM platform, we were keen to develop a smart phone app version. We recognise that more and more people in Essex use mobile technology and we clearly want to be a part of that in how we deliver modern policing.

We want to share as much information as we can with the public, quickly and efficiently so that communities are up to date on local policing issues. The ECM app allows us to target our messages to ensure we get the right information to the right people.

This is the first smart app that Essex Police has launched and we are convinced it will help many people stay safe across the county.

Nick Alston, Police and Crime Commissioner for Essex, said:

ECM App benefit helps to keep you informedWe’re continuing to develop Essex Community Messaging to make it even easier to get key crime and community safety information out to local people faster than ever. It’s also essential that ECM provides a channel for a two-way flow of information between Essex Police, our Watch groups, and the people of Essex.

I encourage everyone to sign up to ECM.  It’s a great way of learning simple measures to prevent crime and it also provides an opportunity to report suspicious behaviour which may help Essex Police to bring criminals to justice.

Information on how to download the app is available on the ECM website: www.essex.police.uk/ecm

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Essex Police & DogLost

Essex Police & DogLost

Essex Police, in collaboration with DogLost are running a campaign to help reunite dogs with their owners however, preventing their loss in the first place is a better outcome all around and so they also offer the following advice:

  • Don’t tie your dog up outside a shop.
  • Don’t leave your dog alone in the car.
  • Make sure your dog has been micro chipped (from April 2016, your dog MUST be chipped).
  • Your dog should always wear a collar and ID tag with your name and address on it.  Avoid putting your dogs name on the disc.
  • Take clear photographs of your dog from various angles, and update them regularly.  Make a note of any distinguishing features.
  • Vary your times of walks and routes; some dogs are actually targeted and snatched during walks.
  • Fit a bell to your garden gate so you hear if anyone opens it.
  • Keep your dog in view in the garden, don’t leave them unsupervised.

If the worst happens and you have a lost or stolen dog:

  • Report stolen dogs to the police as soon as possible by calling 101.
  • Register your lost or stolen dog free of charge with www.doglost.co.uk or call 0844 800 3220 and access their help page for advice.
  • Contact your local dog warden.
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Neighbourhood Watch

Neighbourhood Watch

A special edition Neighbourhood Watch Logo

Interest in Neighbourhood Watch?

Given some unhappy recent experiences it has been suggested that it might be worth considering formally setting up Neighbourhood Watch schemes in our Villages.

Neighbourhood & Home Watch is a voluntary network of schemes where neighbours come together, along with the police and local partners, to build safe and friendly communities.

The aim of the Neighbourhood Watch and Home Watch movement is to bring neighbours together to create strong, friendly, active communities where crime and anti-social behaviour are less likely to happen.

If you would be interested in being involved with this or would like to know more please contact the Parish Council Clerk Sue Pullen on 01206 735 367 or susiepullen@btinternet.com

If enough people are interested we will organise a meeting with a Neighbourhood Watch expert to explore what is involved and what our next steps should be.

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Essex Police Challenge – 9th June

pcc-logoEssex Police Challenge – 9th June

Do you want to challenge the Chief Constable of  Essex Police (Stephen Kavanagh) or the Police & Crime Commissioner for Essex (Nick Alston) about their performance?  Unfortunately we seem to have missed a more local opportunity (March 2015 in Witham) but the next Essex Police Challenge event will take place at Epping Forest College on June 9th, and residents are welcome to turn up and ask their question in person or submit a question by email.  

The event will give residents the chance to raise their concerns and questions about crime and policing in Essex. Essex Police’s Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh will give an update on the performance of the force, whilst the subjects of the night-time economy in the Epping Forest district, travelling criminality, and the new police IT system Athena will also be discussed.

The event – which has taken place across the county – was devised by Nick Alston, Police and Crime Commissioner for Essex and forms a key part of his work to scrutinise the force and hold the Chief Constable to account. It also gives members of the public a unique and valuable opportunity to have their questions answered by both the Chief Constable and PCC.  Mr Alston said:

People still have time to submit their questions ahead of the event as well as joining us on the evening to see scrutiny and democracy in local policing in action.

The Essex Police Challenge takes place on Tuesday June 9 from 7.30pm at Epping Forest College in Borders Lane, Loughton, IG10 3SA. To submit a question for the PCC and/or Chief Constable write to the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner at 3 Hoffmanns Way, Chelmsford, Essex, CM1 1GU or alternatively:

Send your question by email

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Heritage Watch Launched

heritage-watch-logoHeritage Watch Launched

Influential figures in Essex’s heritage industry came together on 23rd of April at Stow Maries First World War Aerodrome to launch a new police initiative aimed at protecting the past. Heritage Watch is an Essex Police led partnership between agencies that are committed to protecting our heritage, as well as members of the public who want to help preserve our heritage.

The watch scheme looks to maintain and preserve important places of interest, encouraging vigilance and reporting of suspicious activity around sites. This is to prevent any theft or crime that may damage assets beyond recovery, which may lead to the loss of a piece of history for this and future generations. Heritage Watch locations would include ancient earth works and archeological sites, listed buildings, museums, galleries, religious buildings, historic visitor attractions and others.

Dominic Petre of the Historic Houses Association said he was ‘very pleased’ about the initiative, adding:

When heritage is lost, it is lost forever. Crimes against heritage are not just crimes against the owner. They are crimes against future generations and culture in general.

Chief Superintendent Carl O’Malley said:

In Essex we have some really significant sites, from the Roman remains in Colchester to Audley End House in Saffron Walden. The key element for any watch scheme is to involve a broad range of different partners and bring them together. Through expert advice and assistance, we can all help one another. It is about communication, sharing, understanding and reporting.

For further information contact your local Essex Watch Liaison Officer using the Police 101 non–emergency telephone number.

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